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Filtering by Tag: Architecture

Liollio Awarded Multiple 2019 Design Awards by AIA South Atlantic Region

Mez Joseph

Liollio Architecture is honored to announce that the 2019 American Institute of Architects South Atlantic Region (AIA SAR) has recognized Liollio projects with three Regional Design Awards. Hampton Health Clinic in Varnville, SC received a New Construction/Substantial Renovation Honor Award. Brighton Park Swim Club in Summerville, SC and James Island Town Hall in James Island, SC both received New Construction/Substantial Renovation Merit Awards. Because these projects were the result of team work and collaboration with clients, Liollio would like to extend sincere gratitude to Hampton County, SC, WestRock and The Town of James Island, SC, along with their project team partners.

Jury Comments:
James Island Town Hall
“This quotation of a simple regional form creates a warm community expression.”
Brighton Park Swim Club “This project was admirable for its modesty and directness.”
Hampton Health Clinic “This modest quiet clinic is designed with great sensitivity to patients and to creating a new warm and comfortable community asset.”

The AIA South Atlantic Region is comprised of three state chapters: GA, NC and SC and is home to more than 5,500 members. Events surrounding the 2019 AIA SAR Annual Design Conference, themed the ASPIRE Experience, took place in Asheville, NC over the course of three days, April 14 to April 16. A new type of collaborative conference, ASPIRE brought together the design and construction community to share stories and influence designers to create a better future. Breaking the mold of the traditional event and taking full advantage of the location, AIA SAR utilized the architecture, community and surroundings of Asheville to create this immersive environment of inspiration and design celebration.

Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting

Mez Joseph

Don't miss the Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting Ceremony on March 5. Mayor John J. Tecklenburg, City Council of Charleston and Roper St. Francis Healthcare invite you to attend the Grand Opening and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony for the Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center on Tuesday, March 5, 2019, 12:30 p.m. at 2001 Henry Tecklenburg Drive, Charleston SC. Tours of the facility and open house activities will follow the ribbon cutting. For more info visit here.

Illuminating the Future: Library as Beacon

Mez Joseph

Browse selected images from Liollio's portfolio of library and educational learning environments. A very special thank you to Richland Library in Richland County SC. Featured projects include Richland Library Ballentine, St. Andrews and Blythewood, College of Charleston Science Building, Charleston Progressive Academy and Hip Hop Architecture Camp®️. Select images courtesy of Richland Library.

Richland Library St. Andrews Featured in 2018 Library Design Showcase

Mez Joseph

Richland Library St. Andrews was featured in the 2018 Library Design Showcase, American Libraries Magazine’s annual celebration of new and renovated libraries. These shining examples of innovative architectural feats address user needs in unique, interesting and effective ways. Renovations and expansions continued to dominate submissions, showing how communities are finding novel ways to conserve and honor existing spaces while moving them well into the 21st century. View the showcase here.

SC Welcome Center at Fort Mill Nationally Honored with 2018 Brick in Architecture Best in Class Award

Mez Joseph

Fired-clay brick offers unlimited aesthetic flexibility, and is an integral part of any sustainable, low maintenance building strategy.
— Ray Leonhard, BIA’s President & CEO

The 2018 Brick in Architecture Awards honor 19 winners for outstanding design that incorporates clay brick. Judged by a jury of independent design professionals, the Brick Industry Association’s (BIA) preeminent design competition awarded five Best in Class, five Gold, five Silver and four Bronze awards from 88 total entries.

Liollio is honored to receive a 2018 Brick in Architecture Best in Class (Commercial) Award for the new SC Welcome Center at Fort Mill! Five Best in Class projects were awarded among the 19 winners. Congratulations to all who made the SC Fort Mill Welcome Center project a success - and all award recipients!

All competition entries will be featured in the Brick Gallery on Brick in Architecture's website. The National Brick in Architecture Awards showcases the best work in clay face and paving brick from architects across the country in the following categories: Commercial, Education - K-12, Education - Colleges & Universities (Higher Education), Residential – Single Family, Residential – Multi-Family, Paving & Landscape Projects, and Renovations. Best in Class winners receive national recognition through a special Brick in Architecture insert in the December 2018 issue of Architect Magazine. All entrants are featured on BIA’s online Brick Photo Gallery here.

Liollio would like to extend a special thank you to this year's Judges: Bill Bonstra, FAIA, LEED AP - Bonstra | Haresign ARCHITECTS John W. Bryant, AIA, LEED AP - Sweet Sparkman Architects Ralph Cunningham, FAIA - Cunningham | Quill Architect PLLC P. Justin Detwiler - John Milner Architects, Inc. Charles Rose, FAIA - Charles Rose Architects Inc Gee-ghid Tse, AIA, LEED AP - Michael Maltzan Architecture, Inc.

Congratulations to the entire project team: SCPRT, SCDOT, J.M. Cope, ADC, RMF, 4SE, Johnson and McCalla, and Meridian Brick

About Brick in Architecture: Founded in 1934, BIA is the nationally recognized authority on clay brick construction representing the nation’s distributors and manufacturers of clay brick and suppliers of related products. Website: www.gobrick.com.

Vote for Liollio in Post & Courier's 2018 Charleston's Choice Awards!

Mez Joseph

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Voting has begun for Post & Courier’s 2018 Charleston's Choice Awards and Liollio has been nominated for Architecture Firm under the Professional Services category! Cast your votes in a wide array of categories now through July 25th. Please support Liollio with your vote by visiting https://bit.ly/2sm64at and scrolling down to the Architecture Firm category. Thank you in advance for your support! #CharlestonsChoice #Architecture #Culture #Context #Collaboration

Michael Edwards & Elizabeth Bernat Lead Roundtable at 2018 NANASP/NCOA Conference

Mez Joseph

Liollio's Michael Edwards, Associate and Health & Wellness Leader, along with Elizabeth Bernat, Director of Senior Services at Roper Saint Francis Healthcare, led a series of roundtable discussions at the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs (NANASP) -  National Council on Aging (NCOA) 2018 Conference in Charleston this month. The roundtables focused on the design and community engagement process for the Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center, a Public/Private partnership between the City of Charleston and Roper Saint Francis Healthcare, to open this Fall.

The NANSP/NCOA Conference is an annual conference hosted by the National Association of Nutrition and Aging Services Programs (NANSP) and the National Council on Aging (NCOA) National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC). The conference brings together leaders from senior center and aging organizations as well as officials from the SC Department of Aging and Disabilities, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the AARP Foundation.

Michael Edwards is the Liollio Project Manager of the Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center located in West Ashley. Elizabeth Bernat is the Executive Director of the Lowcountry Senior Center and future Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center. For more information about the Louis Waring, Jr. Senior Center, visit Liollio on ISSUU or view the Designing for Senior Community & Wellness Brochure.

Liollio Architecture Awarded Multiple 2018 AIA South Carolina Awards

Mez Joseph

Liollio Architecture is honored to announce that the 2018 American Institute of Architects South Carolina Chapter has recognized three Liollio projects with four State Design Awards. Richland Library Ballentine, in Irmo SC, received a New Construction Honor Award and an Interior Architecture Merit Award. Hampton County Health Clinic, in Varnville SC, received a New Construction Merit Award. South Carolina Welcome Center at Fort Mill, in York SC, received a New Construction Citation Award. Because these projects were the result of deep collaboration with clients, Liollio would like to extend special thanks to South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism, South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control, Hampton County and Richland Library.

Events surrounding the AIASC Annual Design Conference took place in Lake City SC over the course of three days, from Wednesday, April 18 to Friday, April 20. This year, AIASC partnered with Lake City’s annual community-wide arts festival and competition known as ArtFields, artfieldssc.org. This year's theme was Community: By Design and focused on the power of art and design in creative placemaking. The Design Awards program and many other sessions were open to the community. Speakers included Michael Ford, Associate AIA, Emilie Taylor Welty, Dan Pitera, FAIA, and Trey Trahan, FAIA. The awards were juried by New Orleans LA-based juries and presented at a Design Awards Celebration held on Thursday, April 19 at The Bean Market during the AIASC Design Conference.

Liollio Architecture Elevates Andy Clark, AIA, to Principal

Mez Joseph

Andy Clark, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Andy Clark, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

It’s an honor to be part of a talented and dedicated team of design professionals that take pride in their work and make even the most challenging days fun and rewarding.
— Andy Clark, AIA, LEED AP, Principal

Liollio Architecture is pleased to announce the elevation of Andy Clark, AIA, LEED AP, to Principal. Liollio celebrates Andy’s accomplishments and is proud to have him as a firm leader!

Andy is passionate about design and the value it brings to our clients through successful collaborations. As part of Liollio's third generation of ownership, Andy leads the educational market and has a diverse portfolio spanning educational, municipal, commercial and healthcare. “It’s an honor to be part of a talented and dedicated team of design professionals that take pride in their work and make even the most challenging days fun and rewarding.” A graduate of Clemson University, with a Master of Architecture and Bachelor of Science in Design, Andy is currently serving as the State President of AIA South Carolina, where he organized the Community: by design Conference in conjunction with ArtFields in Lake City. He has served on the Clemson Architectural Foundation Board, volunteers as a student mentor, and is a Past President of AIA Charleston, where he co-founded a free public lecture series to elevate the design dialogue in our community.

2018 COMMUNITY BUILT ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE

Mez Joseph

Liollio's Andy Clark & Aaron Bowman were recently guest lecturers at the National Community Built Association (CBA) Conference held in Charleston at the Clemson Design Center in the historic Cigar Factory. Their presentation, Community: by design, presented case studies from their leadership roles within AIA South Carolina & AIA Charleston, as well as Liollio case studies of how community engagement efforts have strengthened our design solutions. The presentation focused on building community through: education, dialogue, design, equity, service and practice. Attendees left inspired and excited to apply new methods to improve designs to better serve the communities we work within. Liollio is always exploring new ways to engage the community to extract their story and vision, and translate that vision into a design language.

Children's STEAM: Young Architects

Mez Joseph

We always love the opportunity to introduce kids to the world of architecture and design.
— Jennifer Charzewski, Principal

Liollio’s Jennifer Charzewski, Liz Corr and Mary Tran participated in the Full STEAM Ahead Program: Young Architects at the Charleston Main Library on November 14, 2017.

November is Native American Indian Heritage Month and Liollio’s program aimed to teach the young architects about architecture through vernacular housing types and the ways people built shelters with the materials from their environment. Different vernacular housing types were shown, and they discussed how groups of people respond to different climates. such as, keeping wind out and warm air inside in cold climates, using the sun for passive heating, and being naturally ventilated with breezes in hot humid climates.

The young architects then sketched a vernacular housing type for a location of their choosing and constructed a model of it. Materials such as sticks, clay and fabric were used to make Igloos, Tipis, earth huts, and many other innovative and imaginative structures.

Blueprint for Business: SC Architects on the front line of a Building Boom

Mez Joseph

Warren L. Wise
843-937-5524
wwise@postandcourier.com

Drive down any major street in South Carolina’s largest cities, and it’s not hard to miss the mass of workers in hardhats or the construction cranes towering over once-vacant lots.  From apartments to hospitals and hotels to homes, the building boom is at full throttle.

But before any of those structures get off the ground, they need a blueprint. That’s where architects come in.The people who draw up plans and pencil in details sit on the front line of the economic upswing enveloping the country, and many are busier than ever.

Firms with offices in Charleston and projects across the state and elsewhere say workloads are healthy, competition is steep and the foreseeable future shows no signs of a slowdown.

“The Southeast is hot,” said Tom Hund, a principal who leads the Charleston office of Greenville-based McMillan|Pazdan|Smith Architecture. “It’s one of the best growth zones in the country. It’s quality of life. It’s manufacturing. It’s retirees. And when you narrow it down regionally, the Charleston region is leading the charge.”

He pointed to diversity in the growth of manufacturers such as aerospace and automotive suppliers along with upticks in housing, retirement communities, resorts and tourism as all contributing to the demand.

“In all of those markets, there is great activity,” Hund said.

“We were once known as a tourist city and nowwe are known as a manufacturing and tech city, too,” Hund said of Charleston. “As one market may grow, another may slow, so we have an opportunity for balance. I see a really nice diversity here.”

Marc Marchant, leader of LS3P Associates Ltd., a regional firm based in Charleston, characterized the design market across South Carolina as “shifting into high gear.”

“We are all optimistic about the future and continued growth,” he said, pointing to expansion of the automotive sector near Charleston, a tire manufacturer coming to Orangeburg and continued industry expansion across the Upstate. “I think there is plenty of room for more growth.”

At Liollio Architecture of Charleston, which focuses primarily on public-sector projects, principal Dinos Liollio is bullish on the market across the state and the region.

“I think it’s strong, and I’m very optimistic that it will remain strong,” Liollio said. “Even with a little bit of increase in interest rates, I don’t think it will disturb the building program. Public entities and foundations are in pretty good shape to invest in a robust building program.”

The Midlands market is “robust” as well, according to Doug Quackenbush, president of Quackenbush Architects + Planners. His Columbia f irm handles publicsector projects such as schools, where work is more steady than the cyclical nature of private-sector buildings such as apartments, hotels or office buildings, but in talks with colleagues working with pr ivate- sector desig ns, Quackenbush said, “It seems like right now both are prettyhealthy.”He believes escalating construction costs will eventually lead to a slowdown, especially in the private sector, but the need in K-12 education is so great across the state, the explosion of work will continue.

Among some of the projects Quackenbush is now working on are two elementary schools in Rock Hill, a renovation and addition to an elementary school in the Conway/Myrtle Beach area and an addition to a middle school in Chapin near Columbia.

Quackenbush believes prospects for higher education construction projects are more muddled because of funding restraints, but his firm is involved in the design of the $50 million football operations center which recently broke ground on Bluff Road for the University of South Carolina.

The design and construction market along the Grand Strand shows few signs of letting up either.

“Similar to Charleston, the Myrtle Beach market is growing,” said Marchant of LS3P, which also operates an office in the resort city. “We are seeing more beachfront opportunities, more restaurants and renovations.”

Two of the larger retail projects LS3P is involved with are the redevelopment of Barefoot Landing and Broadway at the Beach.

“They are regenerating the retail experience in many locations, including those two,” Marchant said.

Working with Change

Because of all the construction going on now, Hund said some municipalities, such as Charleston, struggle with how much is too much.

“The architects have to respond to that and remain innovative and creative, which is a challenge,” he said. “The better ones get it done.”

There is so much work, it is putting pressure on the design and construction industries to keep up, architects say. Not surprisingly, clients also are finding it more of a challenge when looking for help, especially for home additions and other smaller jobs.

In Charleston, design is strictly regulated with standards on the cusp of being tweaked, adding another layer to detailed plans. But Hund said proposed changes to the city’s architectural standards actually mean the construction industry is doing so well that new guidelines merit attention.

“That all points to a booming economy and efforts to preserve a quality way to design,” he said. “We want to contribute to our community through the architecture.”

Among the construction projects McMillan|Pazdan|Smith is involved in are the Medical University of South Carolina’s Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital, the proposed 225-room hotel slated for the current site of the State Ports Authority’s headquarters on Concord Street, a new high school in Mount Pleasant and retail village at the developing, mixed-use Nexton community near Summerville.

The firm also is designing an expansion for the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center in the Midlands.

No one knows when the next downturn will hit — some economists say it’s two years out at the earliest — but larger projects, such as apartments or hotels just now taking shape, will take about two years or so to develop and there are other developments in the pipeline, accordingto architects.

“It’s cyclical, so we have to be prepared for that,” Hund said.

Maintaining an Edge

At LS3P, some of the more recently completed projects include the seven-story Tides IV condominium building in Mount Pleasant and the expansion of Myrtle Beach International Airport’s terminal.

Among the firm’s 300-plus projects being designed or under construction at any given time are plans for MUSC’s pediatric ambulatory surgery center headed for the corner of Mall Drive and Rivers Avenue in North Charleston.

Its work also will soon be seen in downtown Charleston with the development of a multistory apartment building at the juncture of Spring and King streets and two others on upper Meeting Street near where the former Cooper River bridges touched down.

With seven other offices across three Southeastern states, the firm recently completed work on an Institute of Innovation for Richland County School District 2 near Columbia.

Marchant said it’s refreshing to see a focus on such educational facilities because they help to train students for the technical jobs sprouting up across the state, not only from local companies but also outside investors. He pointed to the firm’s design work on the new aeronautics training center being developed at Trident Technical College as another example.

Competing for Workers

Marchant noted the educational facilities also will help with one of the challenges facing the construction industry in a revved-up economy: qualified workers for subcontractors.

“As more projects come out of the ground, for subcontractors, so many of those markets become strained,” Marchant said. “Will they be supported by people coming from outside or will they grow locally? And how do we support it from an education standpoint, which is where the technical education system is very helpful?”

Because of the volume of work going on in Charleston and across the state and nation, competitionfor workers is steep.“If there is any issue, it is trying to find qualified help,” Liollio said.

Quackenbush, too, noted, “It’s very hard to find good people.”

Marchant added, “We are competing with firms all over the country to attract good talent. That’s a healthy thing for talent and work. That means the industry is strong.”

Hund, too, pointed to architects working in the firm’s Calhoun Street office and said they get calls from other agencies trying to lure them away.

“It’s very competitive right now,” he said.

National Stage

Liollio characterized the building and design industry across the state as “very healthy” and said, “Most architectural firms are very busy.”

His firm is seeing a lot of activity in municipal work and more emphasis on senior living facilities as the huge bubble of the population known as baby boomers slips into retirement.

“One of the things we are seeing right now is more optimism out of our clients as far as their building programs,” Liollio said. “They are more optimistic about the economy going forward.”

His small firm, with 27 employees and plans to add three more, is working on about four dozen projects in South Carolina and beyond, including the planned new business school for The Citadel.

Liollio’s work includes a preservation project at the Caroliniana Library at the University of South Carolina in Columbia and renovation of one of the student housing units on the historic Horseshoe at the state’s flagship college.

Other projects include work at Historic Brattonsville in York County, the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and Abraham Lincoln’s birthplace in Kentucky.

His firm helped w it h the award-winning makeover of Charleston International Airport and is helping to draw up plans for a new parki ng deck at Cannon Street and Courtenay Drive near the Medical University of South Carolina.

Marchant of LS3P, which has three other South Carol i na of f ic e s in Columbia, Greenville and Myrtle Beach, noted one of the biggest changes during the past five years is interest from outside investors, bringing more work to local architects.

For every project rising from the ground, he said five studies might have proceeded it for the site’s highest and best use.

“We have a lot of other clients who are prospecting,” Marchant said. “They want to know, ‘What can I put there? What’s the feasibility of that? What’s the return on investment?’ We do a lot of study work with different clients. People are still very much interested in Charleston and the Lowcountry.”

He also pointed out Charleston is now on a national stage with its high-profile industries and tourism accolades, and that means more competition for contracts.

“In a project of any substantial size, say $10 million or more, we are seeing a lot of interest in design across the Southeast competing for work here,” he said. “We sort of have to earn our keep.”

ACE Mentors of Charleston End of Year Banquet & Project Showcase

Mez Joseph

May 18, 2017/in Burke HS, Featured, Liollio Architecture, LS3P, Partnership, Personalized Learning, R. B. Stall HS, St. Johns HS, STEM, Work-based Learning, Workforce Development /by Chad Vail

Charleston, SC – May 17, 2017 – A group of local architects, contractors, and engineering professionals are doing their part to ensure the next generation is ready for the critical infrastructure and development related jobs in Charleston, and throughout the nation.

ACE Mentors of Charleston connects professionals with local classrooms for project-based learning and relationship building. Students work in teams on various aspects of large scale, multifaceted construction projects. The students choose the projects and all the elements to bring the design to a workable set of plans, and even a scale model in some cases.

Each year, to celebrate the students’ success and the investment of time by the many volunteers, a special banquet is held to allow each team to share a presentation on their chosen project.

The 2017 ACE Banquet was held at the Wolf Street Playhouse again, and Home Team BBQ was served, complete with cole slaw, mac & cheese, and iced tea.

This year, 3 CCSD schools participated in the ACE Mentoring program: Burke HS, St. Johns HS, and R. B. Stall HS.

Dinos Liollio, a 40 year veteran of the industry, provided the key note speech, and his chosen topic was timely for the students waiting to deliver their own presentations. Mr. Liollo spoke on the impact of non-verbal communication. He used many pictures and a movie clip to illustrate his points, and ended the presentation with a video of the dramatic pre-game ritual performed by the All Blacks Rugby Team from New Zealand. He encouraged the students to be aware of what was being communicated by the position of their arms and legs, their facial expressions, and their eye contact during conversations.

After the keynote presentation concluded, each school was invited to the stage to present their class project.

Mr. Roy Kemp, PLTW Engineering Instructor and CTE Department Chair from Burke High School provided the following account of his experience at the ACE Mentors’ Banquet:

"Last night at the presentation banquet for ACE, a student mentoring program with Architects, Contractors and Engineers, outstanding young people from Burke High SchoolSt. Johns High School and R. B. Stall High School made presentations of commercial projects that they had designed and worked on over the past school term under the mentorship of professionals from the three aforementioned tiers of the construction industry."

The class projects presented included: A pavilion for the International African American Museum complete with sketches, CAD drawings and a scale model by Burke HS students;

a wrestling facility complete with engineering drawings, construction budgets and support materials by St. Johns HS students;

and a regional recycling center with the “world’s biggest recycled water bottle” fountain along with all the other documentations by R. B. Stall HS students.

The projects were ambitious, well planned with acute attention to details, and served their functions within our extended community amazingly well. The presentations were complete with every step of the planning and development process for these projects, and the students were articulate, at ease and presented to the room of some 100 attendees as well as most professionals. I was proud of the efforts, and realized that the ACE Mentoring Program, along with select educators from the CTE department of Charleston County Schools working with them was helping to develop our community’s future through solving real world development problems. They even gave three $1,000.00 scholarships to deserving students!"

Congratulations to Julio Solis, Ignacio Lopez, and Adrian Santiago on their scholarship awards! All three are graduating seniors from R. B. Stall High School.

Thanks to the school faculty and parents for attending to celebrate these students’ achievements. Thanks to Dinos Liollio for delivering an excellent keynote. Thanks to Rob Turner, Chairman of the ACE Mentors of Greater Charleston Board and all the volunteers and supporters of this terrific program for their investment of time and talent, and for a wonderful celebration for all involved to end the year!

2017 DEVON FOREST 5TH GRADE CAREER DAY

Mez Joseph

Mary Tran, Associate AIA, visited Devon Forest Elementary School in Goose Creek last Friday to speak with 5th grade students about a career in architecture on Career Day. Mary had a great time with the students and was as excited to be there as the students and faculty were to have her. She spoke to six classes of 25-27 students lasting 30 minutes each. She spoke in one classroom the entire morning and classes rotate sessions to learn about her career. She talked to students about the general field, what kind of educational and background experience is needed for a career in architecture, what a day on the job is like, her interests and more. Toothpicks and clay were pervaded, and students were encourage to design whatever they wanted using the materials. The only rule was their structure had to stand up. The students enjoyed created their models, which they got to also take home. 

Mary enjoyed interacting with the kids and answering their questions about architecture. “I wanted to be an architect when I was in 6th grade but I talked myself out of it because I didn’t know exactly what architecture was or how to become one. Mary likes educating students about architecture and feels it's important to be an advocate for her field. Mary says, "The kids are so bright and creative. I really enjoyed being there!"

From Clemson to Cambridge: Two architecture undergrads head to Harvard

Mez Joseph

During his time at Clemson, Rayshad Dorsey interned for Radium Architecture, Paragon Construction and Liollio Architecture.

CLEMSON — Founder. Leader. Graduate. These are just a few of the words that describe two students who are receiving their diplomas Friday from Clemson University’s School of Architecture.

Rayshad Dorsey and Brayton Gregory made the most of their time at Clemson by getting involved and excelling in the classroom. This fall, the two will pursue their master’s degrees from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, and both will be attending on full-ride scholarships. Harvard’s graduate program was recently ranked best in the country by DesignIntelligence.

A native of Georgetown, Dorsey grew up in a rural community where he and his mother lived in a mobile home. At age 4, she gave him a Lego set, and since then his interest in architecture continued to grow. With her continuous encouragement, Dorsey immersed himself in the world of design, and as a high school senior he had the opportunity to visit Clemson.

“I was exposed to the everyday life of an architecture student and fell in love with the program. I felt at home at Clemson,” Dorsey said.

During his time as an undergrad, Dorsey took advantage of the services that were offered to him, such as advising, academic success tutoring and the Writing Center.

“I never felt like I was lacking resources at Clemson. If I needed help with anything I could find it.”

And while the opportunities for academic success were readily available to him, Dorsey realized there was something missing from campus: an architecture organization for minorities. As a sophomore, he decided it was time to change that, and in the spring of 2014, he co-founded Clemson’s chapter of the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS).

Designed in collaboration with Clemson University NOMAS for the Barbara G. Laurie Student Design Competition, Fall 2016.

“NOMAS continued to open doors for me. I attended two national conferences and had the opportunity to be a project manager for the national Barbara G. Laurie design competition,” Dorsey said.

The two-time recipient of the American Institute of Architects Grand Strand Scholarship served on the Student Affairs Student Advisory Board and the School of Architecture’s Student/Faculty Advisory Board. He received the Ray Huff Award for Excellence, Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston’s highest recognition for achievement, and, most recently, the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities bestowed him the Blue Key Award, which is given annually to a student who has distinguished themselves in terms of academic scholarship and campus leadership.

Now, Dorsey prepares for his venture to Cambridge, Massachusetts, to continue his education.

“I have an opportunity that a few months ago I couldn’t even dream of having. Harvard is in one of the most intellectual places in the world and I can’t wait to take part in that atmosphere. While I am extremely nervous, I know that Clemson has prepared me well for what lies ahead and I am looking forward to the challenge.”

What will he remember most about Clemson?

“At Clemson, the professors really care. I felt like I could talk to all of my professors about anything. They were all so welcoming and really passionate about teaching. Lastly, of course, I’m going to remember being national champs in football my senior year!”

While Dorsey and Gregory are both accomplished Tigers who will be attending the same graduate school, their paths getting there were different.

A Greer native, Gregory grew up a Clemson fan.

“I knew that this is where I wanted to be even though it was not until later on in life that I found out Clemson was the only school in the state that offered architecture,” said Gregory. “The world of architecture has always been intriguing to me, from the multiple forms of design to the freedom of expression.”

“The Necessary Library” designed by Brayton Gregory during his studies in Genoa, Italy.

In 2013, Gregory had the opportunity to attend his first conference as an undergraduate in Chicago. It was there he was introduced to the American Institute of Architecture Students. Being able to create connections with architecture students from around the world, he began building a strong network and the organization became one he truly believed in. The following fall, Gregory decided to run for a position in the institute. He won, and as membership chair he was able to further advance his skills and connections with others on campus and beyond.

“The position sparked my love for leadership and pushed me to want to reach higher in the organization, which led me to run for president-elect in 2015.”

In 2016, Gregory assumed his position as president. Over the past year, his chapter was recognized as one of the largest and fastest-growing chapters in the South.

Gregory’s research has been presented at the National Conference for Beginning Design Students.

Throughout his undergraduate career, Gregory also served as an undergraduate research assistant and became an active volunteer through his involvement with Pi Kappa Phi.

“In 2014, I went through the process of becoming a re-founding father for Pi Kappa Phi fraternity. During this process, we established a well-rounded organization that is now nationally recognized.”

Gregory’s ambition and dedication to his craft and campus did not go unrecognized. He is the recipient of the Phi Kappa Phi Certificate of Merit, which is given annually to an outstanding student with a 3.5 or higher grade-point average who has made noteworthy contributions to Clemson. He also won the Alpha Rho Chi Medal in Architecture for his professional merit, ability to lead and performing willing service to the school.

“During my time at Clemson, I had a lot of guidance from my peers and professors. The Clemson family is a real thing and one of the most inspiring things about this university. Being from Upstate South Carolina, the move up north will be a complete change in scenery, but I’m very excited about the opportunities that I’ll have at Harvard and believe it will open doors that I never expected.”

- Tara Romanella, Media Relations, Clemson University

Hardeeville Welcome Center Ribbon Cutting

Mez Joseph

The new SC Welcome Center located in Hardeeville opened on Tuesday, May 2nd. The new building is located on the north bound side of Interstate 95 just before Exit 5. It’s the first rest stop once you enter into South Carolina from Georgia. The new building replaces a 38-year-old facility. It has a digital guestbook and tablets with information for visitors. Monitors will display weather updates and road conditions.

“Any time you have tourists coming in from other states, you want to put a welcome mat out there for them. The visitor centers along the state entryways are vital for us,” said Robb Wells, Vice President of Tourism.

The Liollio team is proud to have worked with the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism and many others in bringing the new South Carolina Welcome Centers in Hardeeville and Fort Mill to fruition.

WARING SENIOR CENTER SITE DRONE FOOTAGE

Mez Joseph

Great drone flyover footage of the New Waring Senior Center site and the surrounding area in West Ashley. This City of Charleston project is slated for completion in early 2018. The site is located next to Roper St. Francis Hospital, and Liollio is working with Howell & Howell Contractors, Roper St. Francis and the City of Charleston to bring this project to fruition. Video footage provided by Howell & Howell Contractors.

LIOLLIO ARCHITECTURE ELEVATES JENNIFER CHARZEWSKI, AIA, LEED AP, TO PRINCIPAL


Mez Joseph

Liollio is pleased to announce the elevation of Jennifer Charzewski, AIA, LEED AP, to Principal. As part of Liollio Architecture’s third generation of ownership, Jennifer promotes both the well-being of our design studio and the communities that we serve. Jennifer believes that architecture is about people, and designing places to gather, learn, work, and play is an opportunity to celebrate the pride and the story of a community. “ Liollio Architecture is a family, in every sense of the word, and the talent, enthusiasm, and commitment of our team makes our work a joy.”

A graduate of Texas A&M University and the University of Minnesota, Jennifer is a past President of AIA Charleston, a member of the AIA South Carolina Disaster Assistance Committee, a volunteer with ACE Mentors of Charleston and is currently working with an AIA South Carolina group to establish a committee for Equity in Architecture in South Carolina.

Jennifer has been part of the Liollio team for nine years and her design leadership spans from the award-winning St. Helena Library at Penn Center, Rock Hill’s Main Street Children’s Museum and Charleston International Airport to current projects including Richland Libraries, Charleston Fire Station #11 in West Ashley, James Island Town Hall, SCPRT State Welcome Centers, Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry and College of Charleston Simons Center for the Arts.

Richland Library Ballentine Night sky

Mez Joseph

Construction on Richland Library Ballentine is coming along.
Here's a sneak peek at the "night sky".